FR Click this icon to learn more about our commitment to customers and employees with disabilities.

Employee with an intellectual disability landscapes with coworkers

 

At a rate of 75%, pervasive poverty exists among adults with intellectual disabilities, significantly restricting income security and disability supports to ensure a good life in community. The average income for working age people with an intellectual disability is less than half of that of Canadians without a disability, and nearly half of working-age people with an intellectual disability are on provincial/territorial social assistance as their primary source of income as people with an intellectual disability are discriminated against with respect to paid employment options. 

People with an intellectual disability must have the income and resources they need to secure a good quality of life and fully participate in all aspects of their communities. Where income support is required to assure income security, it must provide an adequate and appropriate income in a progressive, responsive and non‐punitive manner. People with an intellectual disability must have the means to live life with dignity.

Our Vision

Canadians with an intellectual disability have the income and resources they need to secure a good quality of life and fully participate in all aspects of their communities.

Our 2020 Goal

Bring a disability lens to the federal poverty reduction strategy.

Current Work

CACL is currently participating in the Government of Canada’s poverty reduction strategy. CACL and People First of Canada, along with the Council of Canadians with Disabilities and other partners, undertook a five-year research initiative on ways to address persistent poverty. Our concluding recommendations to government point to the need for federal investment in a ‘basic income’ program to meet income security needs of people with significant disabilities.

The first step in the proposed program would be to make the Disability Tax Credit refundable, so that low-income Canadians with significant disabilities who do not pay tax because of limited or no income could begin to get some relief for their out-of-pocket disability-related expenses. Additionally, a reinvestment agreement with provincial/territorial governments is required so that the resulting savings in social assistance payments would be invested in expanding access to individualized and person-directed disability-related supports that enable accessibility and inclusion. CACL continues to work with its national allies to push for this systemic change.

Click here for resources on income security.